Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Immigration Plans for 2009

Immigration Plans for 2009

The Canadian government plans to continue to accept between 240,000 and 265,000 new permanent residents in 2009. The 2009 plan includes the following:

* Up to 156,600 immigrants in the economic category
* Up to 71,000 immigrants in the family category
* And up to 37,400 immigrants in the humanitarian category. *


*Information found on
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/releases/2008/2008-11-28.asp

Immigration Consultants And Lawyers - Who To Be Trusted?

Immigration Consultants And Lawyers - Who To Be Trusted?

Posted using ShareThis

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Video by the Government of Canada on unscrupulous agents

A video by Citizenship and Immigration Canada that warns of the dangers of unscrupulous immigration representatives.

There is no such thing as instant immigration


Immigration is not that easy. Beware illegal agents who will make you think it is. Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it is.

Hiring a representative? Protect yourself. Don’t hire anyone other than a member of the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants, a provincial bar or a Quebec notary. They are the only representatives that can appear before the government on your behalf. It’s the law.

How do I protect myself from Immigration Fraud?

* Be informed – visit the CIC website and investigate the immigration requirements (forms, fees, etc) for your case.
* Interview representatives before committing to a relationship.
* Make sure that the immigration representative is a member of CSIC, a provincial bar or the Chambre des notaires du Québec.
* Make sure you clearly understand what services the authorized representative will be providing and the associated fees.
* Make sure you sign a retainer agreement/contract in your language of choice which clearly indicates all fees and the terms of payment.
* Keep copies of all original documentation provided to your representative
* Do not sign blank forms or applications.
* Check over all information and applications before submitting to CIC to ensure accuracy.

Immigration isn’t easy, eh

March 19, 2009 | By Kristin Laird

Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants (CSIC), the professional regulatory body for immigration consultants, has launched a national multilingual marketing campaign warning prospective immigrants against immigration fraud.

John Ryan, chair and acting CEO of the group, said the effort from McDonnell Haynes Ltd. aims to protect immigrants coming to Canada by raising awareness about the dangers of corrupt immigration agents offering their services.

Clients of immigration consulting services need to be aware that their best protection lies in hiring a member of either the CSIC, a provincial bar, or the Chambre des notaires du Québec, because they’re the “only ones who can appear before the government on behalf of an immigrant who is paying for immigration service,” said Ryan.

“In some cases people are so desperate to be here... that they buy into some of these charlatan stories and they pay big money,” he said.

Launched Wednesday, the print ad features a spray can of “Instant Eh,” which sits in front of a large maple leaf with a headline that reads: “Immigrate the easy way with just one spray of Instant Eh!”

The body copy reads: “Immigration is not that easy. Beware illegal agents who will make you think it is. Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it is.”

The print ad is a light-hearted approach to serious matter, said Ryan. “Immigration fraud is not a laughing matter. However, to catch people’s attention it was felt people would warm up to the concept of Instant Eh,” he said.

The ad directs readers to InstantEh.ca (CanadienInsantane.ca in French) which features a video that warns of the dangers of unscrupulous immigration representatives and a public service announcement by the CSIC on the dangers of hiring an unauthorized representative. The PSA is also available on YouTube.

The print ads are running in English, French, Cantonese, Korean, Filipino and Urdu in major English and ethnic newspapers across Canada.

The campaign wraps up May 20, with a second phase scheduled to launch shortly after. McDonnell Haynes Ltd. also handled the buy.

Originally published in Marketing Magazine, March 2009

Immigrate The Easy Way With Just One Spray of Instant Eh!

TORONTO, March 18 /CNW/ - Today, the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants (CSIC) launched a tongue-in-cheek multilingual advertising campaign designed to shed light on a very important issue - immigration fraud.

"It's no laughing matter when someone's dream of immigrating to Canada is crushed. The advertisement reminds people that the old adage is true, if something sounds too good to be true, it is," said John Ryan, Chair and Acting CEO, CSIC. CSIC members are dedicated to protecting the hopes and dreams of prospective immigrants who want to make Canada their home. A CSIC member is qualified to assist a prospective immigrant understand the various stages of the immigration process and they are required to have the most up-to-date information on immigration law.

Consumers of immigration consulting services need to be aware that their best protection lies in hiring a member of the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants, of a provincial bar or of the Chambre des notaires du Québec. "It's the law. They are the only ones who can appear before the government on behalf of an immigrant who is paying for immigration service," continued Ryan.

CSIC is the professional regulatory body for immigration consultants in Canada. Established in 2004 it currently has more than 1400 members. CSIC's mandate is to protect consumers of immigration consulting services. Consequently, it is responsible for ensuring the education, competency testing and the discipline of its members. CSIC also requires its members to carry errors and omissions insurance and to contribute to a compensation fund.

http://finance.alphatrade.com/story/2009-03-18/CNW/200903180905CANADANWCANADAPR_C9923.html

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Immigrating?

Questions About Immigration to Canada?

Thinking of making Canada your home?

CSIC in line with government’s move to protect prospective immigrants

The Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants (CSIC) supports the government’s efforts to raise awareness about the dangers of unscrupulous immigration agents offering immigration services.

“Vulnerable consumers can find themselves victims of unscrupulous agents and we support the government for taking this important first step to shed light on this serious problem,” said John Ryan, CSIC Chair and Acting CEO.

CSIC will soon step up its own efforts to raise awareness about this problem by launching a unique multi-lingual advertising campaign that will compliment the government’s initiative. “CSIC will launch its campaign on Monday, March, 16, 2009. Our sole purpose in launching this unique advertising campaign is to protect the hopes and dreams of prospective immigrants who want to make Canada their home,” continued Ryan.

Mr. Ryan also applauds the government for recognizing the important role that accredited immigration consultants play in protecting the dreams of prospective Canadians. “There is one very important step that consumers can take to protect themselves from unscrupulous agents and that is to ensure that they have hired a member of the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants, a member of a provincial bar or a Quebec notary. These individuals are the only ones who can petition the government on behalf of prospective immigrants. CSIC looks forward to working with Mr. Kenney, Minister, Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, and the federal government on this important issue,” said Ryan.

CSIC is the professional regulatory body for immigration consultants in Canada. Established in 2004 it currently has more than 1400 members. CSIC’s mandate is to protect consumers of immigration consulting services. Consequently, it is responsible for ensuring the education, competency testing and the discipline of its members. CSIC also requires its members to carry errors and omissions insurance and to contribute to a compensation fund.

http://www.csic-scci.ca/ann/feature.html?which=feature_2

Friday, March 6, 2009

Selection Factors - Skilled Workers

Skilled workers are assessed against a point system consisting of six selection factors.

The six selection factors are:

Factor 1: Education Maximum 25 points

Factor 2: Ability in English and or French Maximum 24 points

Factor 3: Experience Maximum 21 points

Factor 4: Age Maximum 10 points

Factor 5: Arranged employment in Canada Maximum 10 points

Factor 6: Adaptability Maximum 10 points

Total : Maximum 100 points

Pass Mark 67 points

Minimum requirement for Skilled Workers

All applicants must meet the following minimum requirements to apply as a skilled worker:

- You must have at least one continuous year of full-time, paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment
- You must have had this experience within the last 10 years
- Your work experience must be Skill Type 0 (managerial occupations) or Skill Level A (professional occupations) or B (technical occupations and skilled trades) on the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC)
- You must have sufficient funds to support yourself and your family members after your arrival in Canada

Rights & Limitation - Permanent Residents

Rights:

As permanent residents, you and your family members will have the right to:

- live, study and work in Canada for as long as you remain permanent residents
- access most social benefits accorded to Canadian citizens (see Limitations).
- apply for Canadian citizenship, and once granted, apply for a Canadian passport (once you have been a legal permanent resident for three of the four previous years)

Limitations:

There are a few limitations on permanent residents:

- You cannot vote in certain elections.
- You may be ineligible for certain jobs requiring high-level security clearances.
- If you or any of your family members commit a serious crime, you or your family members risk being deported from Canada.

Factors that may delay processing of an Application

The following factors may delay the processing of the application:

- unclear photocopies of documents
- documents not accompanied by a certified English or French translation
- verification of information and documents provided
- a medical condition that may require additional tests or consultations
- a criminal or security problem
- family situations such as impending divorce, or custody or maintenance issues -completion of legal adoption
- consultation is required with other offices in Canada and abroad

Factors that facilitate processing of an Application

There are certain things one can do to help ensure that the application is processed as promptly as possible:

- making sure that all the documentation and information requested is provided at the time the application is made (submitted).
- making sure that the Canadian Visa Office is notified promptly of any and all changes to the mailing address, family composition, or any other information that is important to the application, such as additional education or work experience.
- refraining from making unnecessary inquiries to the Canadian Visa Office regarding the status of the application.

Thursday, March 5, 2009

Alberta PNP Family Stream

Alberta PNP Family Stream
To qualify under the Family Stream, applicants must have a close family member in Alberta (defined as a mother/father, son/daughter, sister/ brother, aunt/uncle, niece/nephew) who is willing to sign a Sponsorship Affidavit of Support.

The Canadian Sponsor must be at least 21 years of age and be able to demonstrate financial ability to support the applicant. He/she must be a Canadian citizen or Permanent

The Applicant must:

Be between 21 and 45;
Be able to demonstrate strong English language abilities;
Have completed post-secondary education or training;
Be able to demonstrate work experience; and
Have at least CAD $10,000 and CAD $2,000 for each accompanying dependent of settlement funds to demonstrate ability to become successfully established in Alberta.

Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP)

The Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) can provide an alternate and quicker means of entry into Canada. It allows Saskatchewan to nominate applicants, who qualify under criteria established by the province, to the federal government for landed immigrant status.

Pursuing Your Business Opportunity in Saskatchewan
The provincial immigration program, Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP), is designed to help entrepreneurs establish their businesses in Saskatchewan.

Eligibility
To be considered for the SINP Entrepreneur Category, you must:

-Have a minimum of 3 -5 years business ownership experience or senior management experience;

-Have a minimum personal net worth of CDN $250,000;

-Conduct a comprehensive Exploratory Visit to Saskatchewan (at least five working days) that includes a Visitation Seminar and interview with a SINP Business Immigration Officer;

-Submit a Business Proposal or Relocation and Settlement Plan;

-Make a minimum, verifiable investment of CDN $150,000 into starting a new business or buying outright an existing business, and have an active management role in the day-to-day operation of the business;

-Intend to own at least 33.3% of your business in Saskatchewan (with a minimum investment of CDN $150,000). If you will not own 33.3% of your business, you must invest a minimum of CDN $500,000 into the business, in either case, you must have an active management role in the day-to-day operation of the business;

-Make a deposit of CDN $75,000 into a trust account and sign a Performance Agreement based on your Business Proposal or Relocation and Settlement Plan.
Making an Exploratory Visit to Saskatchewan

After a SINP Business Immigration officer reviews your pre-application, you will be invited to make an exploratory visit to Saskatchewan, which includes attending a visitation seminar. You cannot attend a visitation seminar or have an interview with the SINP unless you are invited by the SINP.

The detailed information you gather during your exploratory visit will be important for your business proposal should you decide to proceed with a formal application.

During your visit, you will meet with representatives from the SINP and a variety of relevant organizations (e.g. provincial, rural, and municipal government agencies, potential business partners or contacts, industry associations, and chambers of commerce). You will also explore different communities to learn about available settlement services, local schooling, banks, housing, etc.

The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program for Business (MPNPB)

The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program for Business (MPNPB)allows Manitoba to recruit and select qualified businesspeople from around the world who have the intention and ability to move to Manitoba and establish or purchase business in the province, or become partners in an existing enterprise.

SELECTION CRITERIA:
To qualify for the MPNPB applicants must meet the following criteria:

• Minimum personal net worth: C$350,000
• Minimum amount of equity investment in Manitoba: C$150,000
• Demonstrated business experience
• Conducted an exploratory visit to Manitoba to investigate business opportunities and Manitoba’s quality of life for a minimum of seven days.
• Following approval of your application you will be required to make a C$75,000 cash deposit to the government of Manitoba, guaranteeing the establishment or purchase of a business in Manitoba. The cash deposit will be refunded to you when the investment is made and the intended business is undertaken as outlined in your application.

The Exploratory Visit process is mandatory as a first step in applying for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program for Business. In that regard, you will be required to make an application to the Manitoba government for an Exploratory Visit.
After your interview, you will be required to make a formal application to Manitoba including application forms for the province as well as the application forms for Federal government.

Monday, March 2, 2009

How to Check if the Consultant is recognized by the Government of Canada?

All Certified Canadian Immigration Consultants (CCICs) dealing with the Canadian Government must be registered with the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants (CSIC). You can request the consultant to show the identification card or the Membership Certificate issued by the CSIC. You can ask the consultant to provide you with the CSIC Membership Identification number that can be checked at the CSIC web site at www.csic.scci.ca that has a full listof current CCICs. You can also call or email CSIC to check whether someone is registered

Why Use a Certified Consultant?

A certified consultant is your assurance of quality. Certified consultants are equipped with the latest information on immigration law, procedures and practices and go about their business according to a strict, enforceable Code of Conduct.

To become certified, consultants must pass a rigorous application process, which requires evidence of good character, and tests knowledge and language skills.

For added security and client protection, certified consultants are fully insured for errors and omissions and can be subject to complaints that are all duly investigated by CSIC.

Is a Certified Consultant more expensive?

Because certified consultants have to keep their credentials current by maintaining their CSIC membership in good standing and engaging in continuous professional development, they incur more expense. Their rates usually reflect this. In return, a certified consultant offers quality professional services and knowledgeable advice on immigration matters of critical importance to the client.

http://www.csic-scci.ca/content/whyhireccic