Monday, July 25, 2011

Live Immigration Chat: with Amir Ismail - July 28, 2011

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Benefits of Obtaining Immigration Services from a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant

Benefits of Obtaining Immigration Services from a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant 

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are accountable to the Regulator of Immigration Consultants in Canada, the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC). They are audited on a regular basis to ensure that they are complying with the requirements of the regulator and are providing
quality services.

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are educated and informed
Prior to becoming RCICs, candidates are required to demonstrate their knowledge and language skills with entrance examinations.  Since 2004, candidates to become authorized immigration  consultants have been required to complete an accredited program.  An accredited program provides consultants with essential information regarding immigration law in Canada and proper  procedures regarding applications with Citizenship and Immigration Canada.  Additionally, members of the Council are kept well-informed on developments in the immigration field.  They  are required to complete ongoing professional development and Practice Management  Education.

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are required to abide by stringent ethical and  professional guidelines
Council members are subject to a Code of Ethical Conduct that stipulates proper procedures for their practice.  The Code requires all members to adhere to stringent rules, including those regarding quality of service, professionalism, ethical practice and confidentiality.  A breach of  this code is considered an act of non-compliance; it is taken seriously and dealt with  expeditiously by the Council.  Additionally, members of the Council must provide evidence of  good character before being newly regulated, including submitting a police record check.

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are insured
Members of the Council are required to obtain Errors and Omissions Insurance, which protects consumers against unintended actions that may cause financial damage.

The agents of Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are known to the Regulator
Members’ agents, or those individuals who work with RCICs on a regular basis, often play a big part in processing and handling important documents and correspondence.  RCICs are required to provide to the Council a list of agents with whom they work.  The actions of these agents reflect upon the member, and members will thus be responsible for ensuring that their agents act with professionalism and integrity.

Risks of Obtaining Services from Unauthorized Providers of Immigration Services

These unauthorized providers are breaking the law
Unauthorized practitioners who charge money for immigration services are acting illegally. These individuals should not be trusted to provide immigration services in exchange for money.

These unauthorized providers may not be educated or informed
These unauthorized providers may be operating without proper education or knowledge of the Canadian immigration system or Canadian immigration law.  They may be unaware of essential  requirements or procedures in dealing with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and may not be informed of developments regarding the immigration system or of immigration legislation that could have a negative effect on a consumer’s circumstances as related to CIC.

These unauthorized providers may not be ethical or professional
As someone who is operating illegitimately, these individuals may have no qualms about engaging in highly unethical or unprofessional actions.  Many times, these unauthorized providers are seeking only to swindle money from unsuspecting clients.  Additionally, they may engage in unethical or illegal practices in their dealings with CIC, which could jeopardize an applicant’s current and future status with CIC.These unauthorized providers are not accountable to the Council Non-members are practicing without the authorization of the regulatory body.  They are not subject to the rules and regulations that govern Council members, who are held accountable for  their actions by the Council.  They may not properly identify themselves on official documents and records and most likely operate unknown to the Council and appropriate officials.

These unauthorized providers are not insured
Unauthorized providers do not have Errors and Omissions Insurance and are subsequently unprotected and unable to compensate consumers adequately who have been financially hurt.

Source : ICCRC

Friday, July 8, 2011

Immigrating to Canada as a Physiotherapist?

While Physiotherapists are being fast-tracked by the government of Canada in their permanent residence applications as skilled workers, the question remains unanswered as to what steps a physiotherapist should take after he/she lands in Canada. We are currently dealing with a number of Physiotherapists who have filed their Applications for Permanent Residence in Canada through our firm. These professionals understand that being a regulated occupation, Physiotherapy requires newcomer foreign-trained physiotherapist to first obtain the license from the regulator being being allowed to practice as a Physiotherapist. Let's have a look at those steps.

Physiotherapy in Canada

Physiotherapy is the fifth largest regulated occupation in Canada. One-half of all physiotherapists work in or
own a private practice. Other physiotherapists work in hospitals, rehabilitation centres, patients’ homes, homes for the aged, summer camps, schools, sports centres and industrial work sites.

In Canada, physiotherapy is a regulated profession. To work as a physiotherapist, you must register with the
regulatory body in the province or territory where you work. There is a complete list of these regulatory bodies at www.alliancept.org.


The Alliance carries out credential evaluation and administers examinations for competency on behalf of most of the provincial and territorial regulators. The Alliance’s assessments and examinations do not give you the right to practise or register as a physiotherapist in Canada. Each provincial and territorial regulator may have additional requirements. The Alliance provides information to the regulators on credentials and qualifications, and the regulators decide who can and who cannot receive a licence to practise.

Before You Come to Canada 

While you are waiting to go to Canada, there are many important things you can do to improve your chances for success. The Foreign Credentials Referral Office (www.credentials. gc.ca) is an organization of the Government of Canada that provides you with helpful resources such as the Planning to Work in Canada? workbook and the Working in Canada Tool (www.workingincanada.gc.ca). Use these resources to find and collect important information and to develop your job-search plan.

You will need to prove your language skills in English or French or take a test. You can find information at www.language.ca. If you need to improve your language skills, start before you come to Canada.

Your official education, work and identity documents are important. It is much easier for you to gather and
organize your documents while still in your home country.

Make sure you understand translation requirements.

In some cases, you will have to use a professional translation service in Canada or a certified translator.

Becoming a Registered Physiotherapist in Canada

There are a number of steps to becoming a registered physiotherapist in Canada:

1. You must decide in which province or territory you want to work. Next, you must find out what requirements you will need to meet to work there by contacting the regulator in that province or territory. You can find links to the regulators at www.alliancept.org/links.shtml.

2. For most regulators, you must complete The Alliance’s Educational Credentials and Qualifications Assessment (www.alliancept.org). You can begin this before you come to Canada.

  • This assessment ensures that your education and qualifications are similar to the education and qualifications of a Canadian-educated physiotherapist.
  • You will need to prove your language skills or take a language test.
  • You must pay fees for the assessment. For detailed information on the assessment, go to
    www.alliancept.org.
For the province of Quebec, you must apply to have your credentials assessed by l’Ordre professionnel de la
physiothérapie du Québec at www.oppq.qc.ca.

3. For most regulators, you must pass the Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE) administered by
The Alliance.

  • The PCE has two parts: a written component and a clinical component. You must pass the written component before you can take the clinical component. For information on the Physiotherapy Competency Examination, go to www.alliancept.org/ exams_overview.shtml.
  • You must pay fees to take the examinations. For the province of Quebec, you may have to take
    courses or meet other requirements.
4. You must apply to the regulator in your chosen province or territory for a licence or registration.
Requirements differ for each province and territory.

  • In some provinces or territories, you can apply for a temporary licence or registration after you register for the PCE or after you successfully complete the written component of the PCE.

Finding a Job in Canada
  • You should take time to research the job requirements and develop a plan for finding work.
  • Your provincial or territorial association may have job listings or a referral service.
  • Many hospitals and health centres list job openings on their websites.

Provincial and Territorial Regulators

  • College of Physical Therapists of British Columbia www.cptbc.org
  • College of Physical Therapists of Alberta www.cpta.ab.ca
  • Saskatchewan College of Physical Therapists www.scpt.org
  • College of Physiotherapists of Manitoba www.manitobaphysio.com
  • College of Physiotherapists of Ontario www.collegept.org
  • Ordre professionnel de la physiothérapie du Québec www.oppq.qc.ca
  • College of Physiotherapists of New Brunswick www.cptnb.ca
  • Nova Scotia College of Physiotherapists www.nsphysio.com
  • Prince Edward Island College of Physiotherapists www.peicpt.com
  • Newfoundland & Labrador College of Physiotherapists Tel: (709) 753-6527
  • Yukon Consumer Services www.community.gov.yk.ca/ consumer/physioreg.html

Source: Foreign Credentials Referral Office www.credentials.gc.ca


If you are a physiotherapist or have experience in one of the 29 occupations listed in the priority occupation list (available at our website www.amirismail.com), you can also immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker within 12 monts.

Monday, July 4, 2011

Why Use a Regulated Consultant in Canadian Immigration?

Why Use a Regulated Consultant in Canadian Immigration?

Before acquiring the services of an immigration consultant, it is important to understand the difference between a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (RCIC) and an unauthorized provider of immigration services.  RCICs are required to abide by a strict Code of Conduct – available here.  There will be numerous benefits associated with utilizing the services of a RCIC and serious risks associated with utilizing the services of these unauthorized providers.  

Regulated Consultants vs. Unauthorized Providers of Immigration Services:
 Attribute  Regulated Canadian
Immigration Consultant
 Unauthorized Provider of Immigration Services
 Accountable to ICCRC; complaints are taken seriously Yes  No – accountable to no one 
 Monitored by ICCRC; non-compliance is taken seriously  Yes No – may operate unknown to authorities 
 Supported by ICCRC to enhance quality of services  Yes No – not supported by anyone 
 Knowledgeable and informed on immigration law and Canadian immigration system  Yes  No – no education prerequisite on immigration issues
Proficient in English or French   Yes No – may be unable to communicate properly in English or French 
 Required to abide by stringent ethical and professional rules that are designed to protect consumers  Yes No – not subject to any ethical requirements 
 Possess valid Errors and Omissions Insurance for enhanced consumer protection  Yes No – may not have any Errors and Omissions Insurance 
 Work with agents known to ICCRC  Yes  No – no information on their associates
 Required to provide evidence of good character prior to becoming Regulated  Yes No – may have committed fraudulent or illegal activities in the past

Tips for Consumers 

If you are looking to obtain the services from a RCIC, look at the Council’s list of members to ensure he or she is regulated by the Council – if his or her name is not on the list, he or she is NOT authorized. The up-to-date list will be accessible on the Council’s website 

Read the Code of Ethical and Professional Conduct for Members (available on the Council’s website) – this will help you to know what you can expect from a RCIC


Benefits of Obtaining Immigration Services from a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant


A Regulated Consultant is your assurance of quality. Certified consultants are equipped with the latest information on immigration law, procedures and practices and go about their business according to a strict, enforceable Code of Conduct.   

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are educated and informed
Prior to becoming RCICs, candidates are required to demonstrate their knowledge and language skills with entrance examinations. Since 2004, candidates to become authorized immigration consultants have been required to complete an accredited program. An accredited program provides consultants with essential information regarding immigration law in Canada and proper procedures regarding applications with Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Additionally, members of the Council are kept well-informed on developments in the immigration field. They are required to complete ongoing professional development and Practice Management Education.
 

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are required to abide by stringent ethical and professional guidelines
Council members are subject to a Code of Ethical Conduct that stipulates proper procedures for their practice. The Code requires all members to adhere to stringent rules, including those regarding quality of service, professionalism, ethical practice and confidentiality. A breach of this code is considered an act of non-compliance; it is taken seriously and dealt with expeditiously by the Council. Additionally, members of the Council must provide evidence of good character before being newly regulated, including submitting a police record check.
 

Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are insured
Members of the Council are required to obtain Errors and Omissions Insurance, which protects consumers against unintended actions that may cause financial damage. 


The agents of Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants are known to the Regulator
Members’ agents, or those individuals who work with RCICs on a regular basis, often play a big part in processing and handling important documents and correspondence. RCICs are required to provide to the Council a list of agents with whom they work. The actions of these agents reflect upon the member, and members will thus be responsible for ensuring that their agents act with professionalism and integrity.



Risks of Obtaining Services from Unauthorized Providers of Immigration Services
 

These unauthorized providers are breaking the law
Unauthorized practitioners who charge money for immigration services are acting illegally. These individuals should not be trusted to provide immigration services in exchange for money.  


These unauthorized providers may not be educated or informed
These unauthorized providers may be operating without proper education or knowledge of the Canadian immigration system or Canadian immigration law. They may be unaware of essential requirements or procedures in dealing with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and may not be informed of developments regarding the immigration system or of immigration legislation that could have a negative effect on a consumer’s circumstances as related to CIC.
 

These unauthorized providers may not be ethical or professional
As someone who is operating illegitimately, these individuals may have no qualms about engaging in highly unethical or unprofessional actions. Many times, these unauthorized providers are seeking only to swindle money from unsuspecting clients. Additionally, they may engage in unethical or illegal practices in their dealings with CIC, which could jeopardize an applicant’s current and future status with CIC.



These unauthorized providers are not accountable to the Council
Non-members are practicing without the authorization of the regulatory body. They are not subject to the rules and regulations that govern Council members, who are held accountable for their actions by the Council. They may not properly identify themselves on official documents and records and most likely operate unknown to the Council and appropriate officials.
 

These unauthorized providers are not insured
Unauthorized providers do not have Errors and Omissions Insurance and are subsequently unprotected and unable to compensate consumers adequately who have been financially hurt. (Source ICCRC)



Mr. Amir Ismail is a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant based in Toronto with offices worldwide who is authorized by the government of Canada to deal with clients and represent their immigration applications. His contact information is available on his website http://www.amirismail.com for consultations on Canadian Immigration matters.